What is the purpose of a service review?

The primary role of service review is two fold:  First, service review is a safeguard to maintain biblical fidelity within the public gatherings of the church.  Secondly, service review is a tool to cultivate the skill of giving and receiving sincere, helpful, and godly criticism, which does not come naturally.  It must be learned, taught, and molded into believers.  Within these two chief purposes, there are several other purposes to be accomplished in setting this time aside to evaluate:

–          To provide an opportunity to speak words of encouragement as well as correction if needed into the lives of those who led and preached in the public gathering.

–          To create a culture of evaluating the public gatherings, not by preference or style, but biblically, theologically, pastorally, and practically.

–          To create an environment to evaluate critically what is important and what is not important in regard to sermons and services.

–          To create an environment for those participating and observing to learn, grow, and mature in the various roles discussed.

–          To learn discernment in what are helpful, instructive comments—and what are not.

–          To create an environment of humility, trust, fellowship, and openness with our lives to those present.

                                                               

Posted in Training for Ministry
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  1. [...] struggle through the grind of preparing that sermon.  See these previous posts in regard to:  The Purpose and Process of a service [...]

  2. [...] you struggle through the grind of preparing that sermon. See these previous posts in regard to the purpose and process of a service [...]

  3. […] discussions where men come with a desire to grow.  See these previous posts for more info on the purpose and process of a Service Review.  If you have someone unconvinced of what you have observed, the […]

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